Travelling with illnesses: be a pro jetsetter

Help for sufferers, Posts, Travel, Travelling with illnesses series

So obviously travelling is a nightmare, but it gets so much worse when you’re ill. Here are a few bits of advice for next time you hop on a plane.

1. Be organised.

Before you go, gather up all your documents and get them in order, and then write out an itinerary for your travel. Give yourself plenty of time and plan out any rest breaks or emergency stops in advance.

2. Get comfortable.

Pack a snuggly jumper, fluffy socks, and whatever else you need to get cosy. I like to bring a soft, lightweight scarf, so that I can use it as a blanket when it gets chilly. Wear comfy clothes and consider taking an extra pair of shoes that slip on and off. If you’re spending a good few hours on the plane, you need to do it in comfort, otherwise you’ll regret it later.

3. Pack your pills properly.

Make sure you have everything you need in your hand luggage (just in case), and bring all of your appropriate prescriptions as proof. Remember to pack extra in case you run out or lose some. All of this means that can you can guarantee that you won’t lose them in the hold, and you have them in case of an emergency.

4. Stay hydrated.

One of the worst things about flying is that you get reeeaaallly dehydrated. Not only does this give you a headache, but it can severely effect your body, and make chronic illnesses feel ten times worse. Make sure you pick up a bottle of water in duty free, and make the most of any free drinks you’re offered in-flight. If you’re prone to dry skin or eczema, it’s also a good idea to pack a small, travel-sized moisturiser or emollient. Furthermore, rehydration sachets are brill as a pick-me-up if you feel worse for wear, and come in handy for hot weather as well.

5. Upgrade your seat.

It’s worth thinking about paying extra for more leg room, but as a last resort, you can always ask to upgrade to an empty seat once everyone has boarded. This is usually free, as no one is going to be using the seat anyway. This is especially useful if you have joint problems, chronic pain, a weak bladder, or any physical disability, because it means you get more room for movement and easier access to the aisle and toilets.

Hopefully, this will help the next time you travel. I’d love to hear if you have any suggestions, so don’t forget to like and comment. I’ll write a few more travel posts soon, so remember to stay updated! Thanks guys x

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