Fitness for fibromyalgia sufferers

Fitness, Help for sufferers, Posts

24/08/2018

I’m really unfit, no joke. I can’t even walk upstairs without getting breathless. It’s not because I am overweight, though, I just don’t have the muscle strength.

At 5.2″, I’m only tiny, but once upon a time I used to be pretty strong for my size. That all changed when I was diagnosed, because muscle weakness took over. Now, I’m back at square 1 and determined to get on track again. If there’s one thing I’ve learnt, your health gets even worse when you spend 18 months in bed.

Today, for the first time in 2 years, I used a gym. I didn’t do much, only 25 minutes, but I feel so much better. I’m happier than I was an hour ago, and my body feels fresh and energised. I don’t want to hide under the covers any more. Best of all, I have a good excuse to have an hour to myself for a relaxing bath.

My plan is this:

After today, I’ve got another week or so with the same schedule, so let’s see if I can work out every day, and push myself to do more. I’ll use my usual pacing routine to stay within my fibro limits, but aim to add an extra set of reps to each exercise per day, so that I can gradually progress. I’ll update you in two weeks time. Let’s see if I can beat my best.

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1/11/2019 (14 *ish* months later)

Okay so that didn’t work. I felt great about myself for the rest of the day, and then I slipped back into my old ways. In fact, I ended up feeling so crap within the next week or so that I stopped blogging and forgot all about this post… until today.

If you read my post from yesterday, you will know that I put a load of weight on, and then started to lose it again. So what does this mean? Well, for starters, exercise does really work. If you burn those calories, you will lose weight. However, you need to do it sustainably. This means doing exercise that you can keep up with on a regular basis, that will last you forever (or at least for a long time). My plan had no sustainability at all. For a healthy person wanting to exercise, it would be great, but I didn’t take into account that I have to work around my health.

I realised this year that the large amount of walking that I did at school and then at university was what kept me slim. It was super sustainable since I had to do it anyway, and it was a simple walking route that I did repetitively with little variation, making it easy to manage. Then, moving to live on top of a hill (uh oh) plus losing my usual routine, meant that I suddenly didn’t walk everywhere like I used to. It took a while to get myself back to normal, and when I did, it was by using my pre-existing daily activities as exercise.

I decided to focus on increasing my activity levels mostly when I was doing something useful. For example, I found it difficult to wash the dishes because it hurt to stand there, and I got a lot of brain fog and would end up dropping my favourite ceramics. The sink had started to pile up, and I felt nauseous when I thought about washing dishes. Instead, I put some music on, and did what I could whilst singing along (plus occasional dancing). It kept my legs and back moving so they didn’t seize up, and the singing prevented the brain fog from kicking in. I ended up doing a full set of dishes, no problem, and the clean sink actually made me feel good for once. I now do this every other day in small doses, and haven’t smashed a glass in a couple of months.

More often than not, it turned out that I was procrastinating the easiest stuff, and actually, my life was a lot easier when I just did it. The little extra  bits of activity built up throughout the day to burn more energy, too, so I started to feel and look a lot healthier. In the end, I nearly doubled my steps, just by doing what I wanted, rather than putting it off out of laziness or fear. The best bit is, the more you do, the more normal it feels, so over time, you can gradually build yourself up to having a more active lifestyle, whilst getting something enjoyable (and useful) out of it too.

I’m not super slim anymore, and I’d still call myself overweight, but I am much more active than I was a few months back. I can sometimes run up the stairs, I can carry more than one bag of shopping again, and I don’t find it quite as difficult to have a shower anymore. I’d say that’s an improvement, right? I can’t call it a miracle cure or anything, but simply doing that extra little thing that I had been putting off every day or so has gradually led to a better version of me. I still don’t do exercise, and haven’t stepped foot in a gym since I last mentioned, but I find my exercise though my daily tasks instead, and it’s just enough for me.

Share with us below; what is your favourite routine? Do you get much exercise or will you be starting something new? I’d love to hear about your progress, or if there was anything you learned to avoid after your diagnosis.

My latest obsession

Posts, Uncategorized

So I have a confession to make…

I have a bit of an addiction to houseplants. They’re pretty, easy to look after, and university friendly. What could possibly go wrong? Well…

Here’s the thing: having fibro means that you often do silly things out of boredom, and very easily create obsessions to occupy the time when you’re stuck in bed. I got a bit of an obsession with all of the pretty houseplants that I’d seen on Tumblr and Pinterest, and it got a slightly out of hand. Every time I saw an interesting plant, I had to buy it. I spent a FORTUNE.

It doesn’t make it any better that I miss my animals whilst I’m away at university, so I’ve replaced them with a windowsill full of greenery (well I had to find SOMEWHERE to put my affections, right!?). Having plants gives me something to do when I feel well, and something to look at when I’m not. The best bit is that you can choose plants that rely on very little water, so that you don’t have to spend too much time on maintenance, especially when you’re poorly.

Anyway, house plants are pretty good for fibro sufferers (much easier than a dog) and also for tenants who aren’t allowed pets, but they can get pretty expensive. I daren’t tell you how much I’ve spent perfecting my windowsill!

If you fancy starting your own collection, look into buying cacti, succulents, and other common houseplants that require low maintenance. You can pick them up from all over nowadays, most of mine are from my local Lidl supermarket, and I’ve even got a few from the carboot. If you want a good deal, look out for the plants that look a little bit worse for ware. As long as they still have healthy growth and aren’t too far gone, you can usually bring them back to life. My favourite part about that is that the shop usually wants rid of the ones that aren’t doing well, because they are less likely to sell, so you can normally get them at a reduced price.

My favourite plant from my own personal bunch is a spider plant. It fills out the space in my room and, best of all, sprouts loads of new growths. This means that I can snip them off and pot them up, thus giving me loads of new little ones (yay!). I’m currently waiting for my ten spider plant babies to grow a little so that I can pot them nicely and send then as gifts to the people I love.

Let us know if you have any interesting hobbies that are fibro friendly, because it’s great to have an obsession when you’re stuck in bed feeling low. Also, if you have any houseplants that you care for, I’d love to hear your advice. Last but not least, don’t forget to like and comment so I know I’m posting the good stuff!