Fitness for fibromyalgia sufferers

Fitness, Help for sufferers, Posts

24/08/2018

I’m really unfit, no joke. I can’t even walk upstairs without getting breathless. It’s not because I am overweight, though, I just don’t have the muscle strength.

At 5.2″, I’m only tiny, but once upon a time I used to be pretty strong for my size. That all changed when I was diagnosed, because muscle weakness took over. Now, I’m back at square 1 and determined to get on track again. If there’s one thing I’ve learnt, your health gets even worse when you spend 18 months in bed.

Today, for the first time in 2 years, I used a gym. I didn’t do much, only 25 minutes, but I feel so much better. I’m happier than I was an hour ago, and my body feels fresh and energised. I don’t want to hide under the covers any more. Best of all, I have a good excuse to have an hour to myself for a relaxing bath.

My plan is this:

After today, I’ve got another week or so with the same schedule, so let’s see if I can work out every day, and push myself to do more. I’ll use my usual pacing routine to stay within my fibro limits, but aim to add an extra set of reps to each exercise per day, so that I can gradually progress. I’ll update you in two weeks time. Let’s see if I can beat my best.

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1/11/2019 (14 *ish* months later)

Okay so that didn’t work. I felt great about myself for the rest of the day, and then I slipped back into my old ways. In fact, I ended up feeling so crap within the next week or so that I stopped blogging and forgot all about this post… until today.

If you read my post from yesterday, you will know that I put a load of weight on, and then started to lose it again. So what does this mean? Well, for starters, exercise does really work. If you burn those calories, you will lose weight. However, you need to do it sustainably. This means doing exercise that you can keep up with on a regular basis, that will last you forever (or at least for a long time). My plan had no sustainability at all. For a healthy person wanting to exercise, it would be great, but I didn’t take into account that I have to work around my health.

I realised this year that the large amount of walking that I did at school and then at university was what kept me slim. It was super sustainable since I had to do it anyway, and it was a simple walking route that I did repetitively with little variation, making it easy to manage. Then, moving to live on top of a hill (uh oh) plus losing my usual routine, meant that I suddenly didn’t walk everywhere like I used to. It took a while to get myself back to normal, and when I did, it was by using my pre-existing daily activities as exercise.

I decided to focus on increasing my activity levels mostly when I was doing something useful. For example, I found it difficult to wash the dishes because it hurt to stand there, and I got a lot of brain fog and would end up dropping my favourite ceramics. The sink had started to pile up, and I felt nauseous when I thought about washing dishes. Instead, I put some music on, and did what I could whilst singing along (plus occasional dancing). It kept my legs and back moving so they didn’t seize up, and the singing prevented the brain fog from kicking in. I ended up doing a full set of dishes, no problem, and the clean sink actually made me feel good for once. I now do this every other day in small doses, and haven’t smashed a glass in a couple of months.

More often than not, it turned out that I was procrastinating the easiest stuff, and actually, my life was a lot easier when I just did it. The little extra  bits of activity built up throughout the day to burn more energy, too, so I started to feel and look a lot healthier. In the end, I nearly doubled my steps, just by doing what I wanted, rather than putting it off out of laziness or fear. The best bit is, the more you do, the more normal it feels, so over time, you can gradually build yourself up to having a more active lifestyle, whilst getting something enjoyable (and useful) out of it too.

I’m not super slim anymore, and I’d still call myself overweight, but I am much more active than I was a few months back. I can sometimes run up the stairs, I can carry more than one bag of shopping again, and I don’t find it quite as difficult to have a shower anymore. I’d say that’s an improvement, right? I can’t call it a miracle cure or anything, but simply doing that extra little thing that I had been putting off every day or so has gradually led to a better version of me. I still don’t do exercise, and haven’t stepped foot in a gym since I last mentioned, but I find my exercise though my daily tasks instead, and it’s just enough for me.

Share with us below; what is your favourite routine? Do you get much exercise or will you be starting something new? I’d love to hear about your progress, or if there was anything you learned to avoid after your diagnosis.

One year on…

Depression, Fitness, Lifestyle, Pain, Posts, Update, Work

It has been just over a year since I last wrote a post, and, in that time, a lot has happened. You might have known that I dropped out of university last year, following a dip in my health over the autumn and winter. I had a bad experience living in university halls and ended up moving into a rented house with my partner. Shortly after, I realised that university wasn’t for me, and officially finished just after Christmas. Around the same time, I had a few new additions to my medication, a couple of emergency trips to A&E, and a major loss in my social circle.

Having lost most of my friends upon leaving university, and generally having most people ghost me due to my fibro, I was left with barely anyone to talk to. The rest of my social circle is either too far away, or just doesn’t really care.  Luckily, I still had my best friend in the form of my partner, Joe, but other than that, I was incredibly lonely.

Well anyway, I decided to take the advice I had been given, and find my company elsewhere. On mother’s day, I became a mother myself.. to two gorgeous little kittens, Cleo and Layla. As therapy animals, I am allowed to have them in rented accommodation, even if it is otherwise not pet- friendly. As my GP had advised it, my Landlord said it was okay.

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Cleo and Layla have literally kept me alive this year, and have been there for me constantly. In fact, they are currently perched on the end of my bed, sleeping as I write up this post. I will definitely be writing more about them soon, as I have been planning to do a service animal post for over a year now and, to be honest, I could ramble on about my fur-babies for hours.

This isn’t the end of my story though, as there has been a lot more that has happened this year.

Joe has settled nicely into a job now, and we have, just about, got a steady income. However, since I can’t hold down a job, we have had a rough time with money troubles this year, too. At one point, we couldn’t even afford a weekly grocery shop, and Lidl seemed expensive. All things considered, we needed to cut down on our expenditure. It’s now nearing the end of our (quite expensive) tenancy, and so our miraculous plan was to move house, to somewhere cheaper. Funnily enough, the house we found is only 12 doors down from where we are now, is even more beautiful, and is £250 cheaper per month (bargain). I’m hoping that these savings will give me the opportunity to start up my own craft shop, and slowly but surely help us to progress.

Over the last year, I also gained a lot of weight. Having dropped out of university, I suddenly wasn’t walking to lectures on a daily basis, and having Joe’s car meant I didn’t have to walk anywhere else, either. As useful as it is to not be losing as much energy over travel, it also meant I wasn’t burning off as many calories, and these started to build up. Over the space of the year, I went from 9 stone to 13 stone, gaining almost half my original bodyweight in fat. Not only is this unhealthy, it made my fibro more difficult to cope with, and made my self esteem plummet even further. It wasn’t until I had to care for the kittens, and started to form a daily routine, that I started to lose it again. Since August, I have now dropped back down to 11 stone, and I am hopeful that I will continue to lose some more.  Before the kittens came along, I spent nearly every day in bed, and only got up for a few hours a day, when joe came home in the evening. I felt that I had little to no reason to exist, so would hide under my duvet all day, feeling poorly. This went on for months, hence why I put on so much weight.

Note to self: hiding under the duvet doesn’t work for more than a day or so. Eventually, you have to come out.

Thats not the only trouble I had this year, either. Say hello to my nasty little friend, insomnia. Although I have always struggled to sleep at night, it has now reached ridiculous levels. I used to need between 1 and 4 hours to go to sleep, but now, I can be still awake when joe gets up the next morning. It doesn’t happen every night, but still occurs several times throughout the week, leaving me to oversleep through the day and make the cycle even worse. Fun.

I am in the process of applying for CBT, and I am also thinking of asking my GP about sleep medication. For now though, I am completely avoiding caffeine, going to bed early, eating healthily, and trying to get as much fresh air and exercise as I can during the day. I am looking forward to moving soon, as it will give me the opportunity to be more active around the house, as we will be packing, unpacking, decorating, and sorting the garden, most of which I will do whilst Joe is at work. Hopefully, this will help me to lose weight and sleep better too, fingers crossed.

For now, I would love to get back into writing on this blog, as I realised today just how much I have missed it. Keep an eye out over the next few weeks for some more posts, as I will definitely be writing again now I have written this.

Let me know if you have any questions or advice, I’m always open to comments and love to hear feedback!

Bye for now 🙂

 

Depression and Fibromyalgia

Depression, Posts, What is fibromyalgia?

Author’s note: A while back, I had a little help coming up with a post idea, and I wrote it up, but never got round to finishing it. Well, here it is, finally completed, more than a year later. Better late than never, I guess…

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My wonderful mother-in-law gave me an idea tonight whilst I was talking to her, so I decided to take her advice and write a post on it.

She told me that I should look into the effect that fibro has on my mood (and vice versa) to see if (and why) there may be a correlation between the two. My response is this:

Yes, fibromyalgia does have an impact on my mood. A BIG ONE. The multitude of horrible facets that fibro gives you; the pain, the tiredness, the forgetfulness, and so on, mean that it’s very difficult to stay positive. For me personally, antidepressants are a must, but there’s loads of other things I try to do on top of that to help me stay happy. I keep tidy (OCD plus chronic illness is a recipe for disaster), eat healthy, do things that I enjoy, and surround myself with positive people, plus many other little touches; all of which keep me happy(er). Obviously the odd low mood is inevitable once in a while, but I try to keep it under control as much as I can.

Furthermore, my mood ALSO has an impact on my fibro. We all know that having depressive symptoms can leave you feeling under the weather in terms of your motivation, but it also effects the physical body too. I find that when I am down, my pain levels reflect this and my energy levels drop as well. In addition, I have a greater sensitivity to temperature change, noise, and brightness, and my cognitive abilities begin to deteriorate. I can safely say that yes, my mood does impact my fibro, although why I have no clue.

Funnily enough, it shouldn’t be a surprise that my mood and my fibro are interlinked, as they are co-morbid with each other. This makes sense, since both are thought to stem from issues relating to the nervous system. Due to this, I have been prescribed a very useful form of medication known as an SNRI. If you are unfamiliar with these, they are a type of antidepressant which effects chemicals within the nervous system (serotonin and norepinephrine, to be exact), and has the simultaneous effect of dulling my pain and lifting my mood. Bonus.

Now, back to the original question, I can safely say that my mood and my fibromyalgia are interlinked, especially since they are co-morbidities. However, the exact reason as to why can only be explained with the development of fibro related research. As for now, we can only guess that it is due to neuropathic structures and the role of the nervous system. I wrote a similar post to this, explaining a few theories as to what causes fibromyalgia, so you might want to check it out here. I will also be writing a few more posts soon which will relate to this topic, such as what symptoms are common, what co-morbidities may be linked, and some more scientific explanations surrounding fibromyalgia.

In the meantime, let me know if you have any of your own science-y questions, and I’ll try my best to answer them (no promises- it’s been a while since my A-levels!). Likewise, if you think you have an answer, I’m sure we would all love to hear it.

 

This will help if you feel suicidal.

Depression, Help for friends, family, and significant others, Help for sufferers, Posts, Uncategorized

Having been away on a volunteer trip for the last two weeks, I somehow managed to mess up my antidepressants. Oops. I’ve been in a bad way recently, and most of my blog is on hold for now. However, I thought it was urgent to post this, so here goes…

This is what you should do if you find yourself in a similar situation; feeling depressed or even suicidal.

1. SEEK HELP IMMEDIATELY.

Call a friend, a family member, or a helpline.

Having someone to talk to can help calm you down and rationalise what may potentially be an irrational bunch of thoughts. And besides, at least it gives you someone to rant to! Getting help can make a difference in what could potentially be a life- threatening situation.

I’ll add some useful helpline links at the bottom of this post for anyone who may need them, but a quick Google can do just as good.

2. Be mindful.

Practice breathing, focusing on your body, and acknowledging (and then dismissing) your thoughts. By spending a few minutes doing this, you can help yourself to relax and think more rationally. This is especially useful if you have no one there to help and have to rely on your self to calm down.

Another mindfulness trick I like is to count out loud three taps of my dominant thumb onto each finger of my dominant hand, starting at my pointer, working to my pinkie, and then going back along to my pointer again. Basically make a pinching motion three times with each finger and repeat until you feel calm. This helps you to focus on something physical, grounding you to the present.

3. Get to your safe space.

It is very important to find your safe space, somewhere where you can relax and feel comfortable. Often, this will be under your duvet, in the bathroom, or in another quiet place. However, if you are feeling suicidal, it is important that there is someone else available to you if you need help. I would advise that you have a ‘secondary’ safe space, at a friend’s house, for example, where you have the added benefit of another human for comfort and support.

When feeling severely depressed, this is a good method of reducing any external stimuli, which may otherwise impact any anxiety or bad thoughts that you may be experiencing.

4. Treat yo’self.

Eat your favourite food, read a book, listen to your favourite song, or watch a film. Whatever it is that helps you to feel better.

Personally, I like to hide under my bed covers (safe space) with a good book and loads of food (think: ice cream, chocolate, cheese, crisps), or I’ll run a bath and sit mindfully whilst it is filling. Locking myself in the bathroom with the noise of the tub filling gives me a chance to get away from the stress of the ‘outside world’.

Anyway, that’s all for today, but I’d like to round up by asking my usual request, let us know if you have something to share! And one last thing..

You are loved ♡

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International:

https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

https://www.befrienders.org/need-to-talk

UK only:

https://www.samaritans.org/

https://www.mind.org.uk/

********http://chronicallyme.org

Travelling with illnesses: what I was told.

Help for sufferers, Posts, Travel, Travelling with illnesses series

So I’ve got an apology to make. I haven’t posted anything in over two weeks. This is partly because I have been suffering (more on that soon), but also because I’ve been jetsetting.

For the last two weeks, I’ve been in a beautiful little country called Laos, making an attempt to help those less fortunate than me. Not only has it been one of my lifelong goals to travel, but spending time there helped me to improve who I am as a person, and truly push my limits to the max.

Of course, traveling with fibro, or indeed any other chronic disability, can be a bit of a challenge. Whether it be the plane journey, the climate differences, or the new activities; travelling can be a pain (literally!).

Throughout the next week, I’m going to be sharing a little about what I did over in Laos, along with giving some helpful tips for you to remember the next time you’re abroad.

In the meantime, here are a few suggestions I was given whilst away, that you might like to try out for yourself…

1. Be mindful.

I was told that one of the most important parts of looking after your body involves being able to listen to what it has to tell you.

Next time you have a quiet five minutes, get yourself comfy and listen. Start by breathing slowly and deeply, counting your breaths and feeling your body relax as you do. Then, focus on each part of your body, starting at your toes and working up to your head, and allow yourself to feel what’s going on there. Forget about your stress, forget about the outside world, just focus on you. Once you reach the top of your crown, allow your mind to accept and then let go of those feelings, and then concentrate back on your breathing.

This time, try and empty your mind, and allow any new thoughts, feelings, or worries to float through your mind and be let go. Spend a few moments like this, allowing your mind and body to relax and push aside any mental or physical problems for the moment.

2. Get a massage.

Sometimes, having a massage can really help you to relax, and what better way is there to treat yourself than to soothe your body and ease any achy muscles? Next time you have some spare cash, book yourself in to your local spa; or if you prefer to spend a little less, get a close friend or family member to spend some time with you for a pamper evening, where you can help each other.

3. Try yoga.

Personally, I haven’t had the chance to properly test this one out yet, but loads of people have told me that it is worth the effort.

Start simple and spend five minutes each day stretching out your body and focusing on breathing exercises. As you adjust, build up your routine to focus on longer, more complicated yoga positions. If you need inspiration, just try searching your fave social media for some yoga advice, as it is a popular hobby that is widely available online.

Do you have any advice you’d like to share, or an idea to try? Or, maybe you have something to say about what I’ve shared? Let us know what you think in the comments below, and don’t forget to like and share if you enjoyed this read!

Thanks guys!

What is ‘pacing’ and how can it help my fibro?

Help for sufferers, Posts, Work

Plenty of people with chronic illnesses like to talk about pacing, but if you’re newly diagnosed or have only recently started looking for advice, then you might not know what this is.

Pacing is a method of coping with the fatigue-like symptoms often associated with chronic conditions such as fibro. It involves creating a broken down or spread out routine, so that tasks can be separated into smaller, more manageable chunks. This ensures that you can concentrate longer on tasks by giving yourself small rest breaks in between.

For example, I like to split up my daily chores, study sessions, and various errands by having at least five to ten minutes of nothing for every hour or so. After a while, I have a larger break, and if I’m struggling, I will increase the frequency of my breaks. If you don’t like to sit and do nothing, try doing something easy that takes little energy (mental, physical, or otherwise) and is a distraction from your task.

(N.B: From here on it gets complicated, so you might want to skip the next paragraph if you dont fancy the heavy reading!)

The next question is this; how do you figure out your rest to work ratio? Well first of all, you need to spend some time figuring out how long you can go before you lose the will to live. This is how long you can go before you need a big break. Then, try and count how many times within this you get distracted; this is how many mini breaks you need. Spread them evenly within the time frame, and aim for between five and fifteen minutes for each break. you can alter this to your taste later, if necessary.

If all of this sounds too complicated, just remember to aim for 3:9:10 (for every 3 hours, have 9 equally spaced lots of 10 minute breaks, so every 20 minutes have a break). Or, have a 10 minute break every so often if you can’t keep count. Don’t forget as well that you can mix up the same ratio for smaller or larger amounts of time, and for every 3 hours, have at least half an hour or more to recuperate.

Most importantly, though, is to remember that you aren’t aiming to get loooaaaddss done, but to work at an efficient pace that keeps you healthy and happy. If you can’t do as much as you thought, that’s okay. Just stop for the day and adjust accordingly tomorrow.

If you like my pacing method or think you have something to input, please help us all out and let us know in the comments.

Thanks for reading!